Bob Lanier died

Bob Lanier has died at 73, the former pivot who played for the Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee Bucks.

Former Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee Bucks pivot Bob Lanier, one of the most dominant of the 1970s in the NBA, has died at age 73 from an illness, the North American Basketball League announced Tuesday night.

The nature of his illness was not specified by the NBA, whose boss Adam Silver paid tribute to this “member of the Hall of Fame,” the Hall of Fame he joined in 1992, “and one of the most talented interiors in history,” in a statement.

Drafted first by Detroit in 1970, Bob Lanier was a thin left leg which also made his power speak (2.11 m, 113 kg) on the floors, quickly becoming one of the best pivots of the championship, certainly in the shadow of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

He averaged 22.7 points, 11.8 rebounds, 3.3 assists, and 2 blocks during his ten seasons with the Pistons. He couldn’t guide them far in the playoffs as impressive as he was.

In his last season as an NBA player (1983-1984), he played his only conference final for the Bucks, his second team in 14 years.

Eight-time All-Star Game selection, who was named MVP in 1974, Lanier turned into a “double-double” throughout his career (20.1 points, 51.4% shooting, 10.1 rebounds, and 1.5 blocks per game).

As interim coach of the Golden State Warriors from 1994 to 1995, Brown coached 37 games (12 wins, 25 losses).

For thirty years, he was a special advisor to (former commissioner) David Stern and then to me, traveling the world to teach values of basketball and impact young people around the globe, said Adam Silver.

His impact on the league went far beyond what he accomplished. His considerable influence on the NBA was also evident when he was president of the players’ union between 1980 and 1985, playing an important role in negotiating a decisive collective agreement,” he added.

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