Pamela Ware
Pamela Ware (Getty image)

Pamela Ware acknowledges that her misadventure at the Tokyo Olympics last year left its mark. 

Though she is determined to continue diving until the 2024 Paris Olympics, the 29-year-old diver is still haunted by this painful episode.

In Tokyo, she was about to qualify for the 3-meter springboard final. But she missed her jump on her perilous and a half overturned with three and a half spins. Due to this technical fault, she had to jump in feet first.

“The Olympics are still a traumatic moment for me,” she said Monday, the day after she participated in the third stage of the FINA Diving Grand Prix in Calgary. 

It still plays in my head, and I still need a little time to get over it. I think the more competitions I do, the more comfortable I feel and regain confidence.

Resuming her workout routine after a few months away from the pool on her return from Tokyo wasn’t easy.

“I changed coaches first, which was a big change. Then there were the departures of Meaghan (Benfeito) and Jennifer (Abel). We had been together for 15 years.

“I tried to start doing that dive again – which she was the only one to do in competition – but it was too difficult mentally. 

We decided to abandon it and do another dive I’m still working on. It felt good to do something else and not go back in time.

Regain confidence

Nevertheless, the last few months have not lived up to his expectations. 

She could not secure her selection for the World Championships in Budapest, Hungary, from June 26 to July 3, and the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England, this summer.

“It’s not a very important year, and it’s more next year and 2024 that count. I would have liked to have qualified for the Worlds and the Commonwealth Games. 

But I tell myself that it gives me more time to train and improve without pushing things too much.

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After fifteen years with Aaron Dziver, the Montrealer is now working with Hui Tong. A new coach was hired after the last Games by Plongeon Canada. She believes that this change has benefited her so far.

“With all the changes, I sometimes have a hard time staying positive, which helps me to be more positive. It helps me to be more confident in myself.

Ware must also adapt to her status as dean in a young team amidst rebuilding.

“I hadn’t thought about it until Mitch (Geller, the technical director) told me about it before the nationals in Saskatoon. 

He wanted to know if it was playing in my head. It must be said that I am eight years older than the others. It is a big age difference. 

With Meaghan, we were close. We talked about everything in training and even outside the pool. It’s just hard not to have her by my side.

She also intends to approach Benfeito to ask her how she handled the situation herself.

Ware has one last competition on her calendar this season, in Italy next month, after which she will focus on training. After discussion with her team, she will adopt a program that will better respect her limits.

“I’m not necessarily able to keep up with young people. I am no longer 17 years old. We have an hour break between our two-hour training sessions. 

I have a hard time recovering. It was decided that I would have a three-hour break, which would allow me to return home between my two sessions.

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